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Astrology:  Meaning of Date and Time of Birth

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The Weekday of Birth Correlation with Where We Are Inclined to Seek Fulfillment (An Original Theory)


Click on the day to find out where people born on that day tend to be happiest:

Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday


For more on this, see An Experiential Understanding of How All that Is Came to Be

Sunday


People born on Sunday tend to be particularly concerned with light (e.g. Ernst Mach, who is known for his study of sound, but who studied light much more; or Albert Michelson, who measured the speed of light several times and carried out the Michelson-Morley experiment—which involved sending two beams of light out from the earth, one in the direction the earth was moving, and one in the opposite direction, in order to measure the speed of light by measuring the ether that was believed to permeate space, much like water—and Edward Morley, with whom Michelson carried out the experiment, was born on a Monday, and so probably viewed this as a measure of the propagation of waves of light in a sea of ether), or with simplicity (e.g. Enrico Fermi, who always sought simple methods of approximation and conveyance of information when complex mathematics and theories could be avoided, such as when he estimated the strength of the blast of the first atomic explosion in the Manhattan Project by dropping some pieces of paper where he was in order to allow them to drift in the air when the blast wave came by; or Paul Ehrenfest, who sought clarity in simplicity, writing papers that each concerned only very few basic points and using simple examples and models to the exclusion of complex mathematics in his publications, his conversations, and his teaching; or Bernhard Riemann, who simplified physics by proposing a theory of higher dimensions; or John Archibald Wheeler, who sought to reduce all physical phenomena to the geometry of spacetime, and who coined such simplifying terms as “black hole” and “wormhole”, and who also proposed, with his idea of the wavefunction of the universe, that we bring the universe—both past and present—into being, essentially from nothing, through our observation and explanation of it), or with the creation or definition or formation of completely new worlds or other completely new things—either in their writing (e.g. Arthur C. Clarke, author of 2001: A Space Odyssey; or J. R. R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings; or George Lucas, creator of Star Wars), or in the real world (e.g. Abraham Lincoln, who, in his words and actions, was pivotal in the formation of a United States without slavery; or Charles Darwin, who developed the theory of the evolution of entirely new species; or Jean Piaget, who described the developmental process for new human beings—the development of children from birth into beings with the capacity for logical and abstract thought).

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Monday


People born on Monday tend to see water-related things, like waves and flowing and bodies of receptive—or collective—water, in everything (e.g. Alessandro Volta and Georg Ohm, both of whom studied the flow of electricity; or James Clerk Maxwell, who saw the commonality of the wavelike nature of electric fields and magnetic fields and light and so saw that he could combine all of them in the single theory of electromagnetism; or Hendrik Lorentz, who proposed that light comes from the wavelike motions of charged particles in atoms, and who sought to describe the propagation of electromagnetic waves in different reference frames that are in motion relative to one another, and who also worked on such explicitly water-involved projects as the prediction of the effects of flood control in Dutch dikes; or Carl Jung, who proposed that there are universal psychological archetypes that reside in the ocean-like collective unconscious), or to concern themselves with infinity or with paradoxical things—and often to write with the abstruseness suggested by such content—(e.g. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, who developed a concept of mind or spirit that arises out of the integration of a series of contradictions and oppositions—much like the horizon arises in the mind out of the union of the liquid water of the sea and the water vapor of the sky—and whose writing is notoriously difficult to read and understand; or Georg Cantor, who proved the existence of an infinity of infinities; or Paul Davies, who has concerned himself with the paradoxes of time’s arrow and of time travel, as well as with curved space and even black holes—those objects wherein our understanding of the universe breaks down in paradoxical infinities), or simply to seek out and particularly focus on water (e.g. Daniel Bernoulli, who studied hydrodynamics, writing the book Hydrodynamica, which gave the field its name, and who formed Bernoulli’s principle—regarding the inverse relationship between the velocity and pressure of a fluid—and who worked on several projects concerning such things as tides, ocean currents, and ships; or Horace R. Byers, who studied cloud physics and the lifecycle of thunderstorms; or Rachel Carson, who loved to read about the ocean, and who wrote plenty about life in the ocean, herself, including in the books The Sea Around Us, The Edge of the Sea, and Under the Sea Wind, and who also wrote about environmental pollution by pesticides in the book Silent Spring; or Hermann Hesse, who chose to live on Lake Constance, and then right by Lake Lugano, and who wrote extensively about the flowing water of a river in his book Siddhartha, making the river a pivotal influence in the main character’s spiritual development toward the peace and contentment of enlightenment).

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Tuesday


People born on Tuesday tend to view the world through the struggle to rise up and away from where their roots are (e.g. Martin Luther King, Jr., whose words and actions were pivotal in the American civil rights movement, in which African Americans struggled to rise up and away from their roots in slavery, subjugation, and segregation; or Sigmund Freud, who based the development of his theories of human psychology—as that of the id, ego and superego—on the idea of our struggling to overcome repressed desires; or Lev Vygotsky, who studied child development and saw it as being shaped, through internalization, by the culture from which a person comes—by the social interactions with parents and other important people in a person’s life in which the person has his/her roots of language and knowledge; or Franz Kafka, who wrote of characters who were constantly struggling, and whose writing has been interpreted as being about his own struggles with his family or with his Jewish roots or with other aspects of his life; or C. S. Lewis, who constantly struggled with his Christian roots and with Christian belief in general in all of his writing, becoming an atheist and then returning as a defender of the faith; or Richard Leakey, who has struggled throughout his life to try to get away from the archaelogical world of his parents in which he was brought up; or Thomas Kuhn, who struggled with the accepted rule-following view of the nature of science in which he was educated, and who wrote in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions of how science develops basically as a series of struggles to grow away from accepted paradigms; or Friedrich Nietzsche, who came up with the idea of the ubermensch, the over-man who rose above the constraints of man; or Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, who both developed ideas about the working class rising up out of its condition of poverty; or Deepak Chopra, who grew away from Western medicine—and its idea of health as merely being without illness—to advocate alternative medicine, mainly self-awareness and meditation, in order to heal—or rise above and away from—illness and toward wellness, toward perfect health), and to spend a lot of time around trees or foresty areas (e.g. Jane Goodall, who studied chimpanzees in the forest; or John James Audubon, who studied birds—primarily surrounded by plant life).

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Wednesday


People born on Wednesday tend to view the world through the model of the celestial bodies (e.g. Ernest Rutherford and Niels Bohr, both of whom saw in the atom an image of the planets orbiting the sun and described the atom from this perspective; or Edward Teller, who worked on the Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb, but who wanted to be working on a fusion weapon—using the power that fuels the stars—rather than on a fission weapon), or to look to those bodies themselves and their effects (e.g. Isaac Newton, who developed the theory of gravity to explain the orbits and interactions of the celestial bodies and their effects upon us, and who looked to the light of those bodies in his study of optics and the rainbow spectrum of light; or Giovanni Domenico Cassini, who was drawn to the sky and studied both astrology and astronomy, discovering, among other things, the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, which was discovered near the same time by Robert Hooke, who was also born on a Wednesday, and who also explored the planets, as well as their gravitational relations, and the moon and stars, through telescopes; or Edwin Hubble, who looked through a telescope and discovered galaxies beyond the Milky Way, and also discovered the redshift of the light from stars, which would later be used to determine that the universe is expanding; or Al Gore, who has become very involved with trying to stop global warming—the effect of the sun on the earth in combination with the carbon dioxide that we are emitting), or to look to the ultimate source or influencer of experience as being something distinctly separate from the form in which, or the means by which, we experience it, like the distinction between the sun, along with other celestial objects, and the light that we receive from them, or between the celestial bodies and their effects upon the world (e.g. John Locke, who held that there are primary qualities of objects that exist inherently in objects and that there are also secondary qualities of objects that are dependent upon our experience of those objects; or Immanuel Kant, who developed a theory of things in themselves—things that cannot be directly experienced but that in some way give rise to what we experience; or Gottlob Frege, who distinguished between the sense—the means by which one refers to something—and the reference—the thing to which one refers), or simply to surround themselves or concern themselves with the stars and the sky (e.g. William Herschel, who made hundreds of telescopes and discovered the planet Uranus—on a Tuesday, and necessarily after sunset, making it a Wednesday as we are defining the days—and two of its moons, as well as two moons of Saturn, and who, while studying the light from the sun, discovered infrared radiation; or Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, who studied the structure and development of stars; or Vincent Van Gogh, who is famous particularly for his painting Starry Night).

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Thursday


People born on Thursday tend to concern themselves with the substance and constituents of the physical and nonphysical (or more ethereal) realms and how things in one realm become things in the other realm (e.g. Michael Faraday, who studied electromagnetism and electrochemistry and how these can become other more practical and tangible things, such as through the use of the electric motor, the basis of which he formed; or Thomas Edison or Nikola Tesla, both of whom were thoroughly involved in inventing more tangible things with the use of the more ethereal electricity; or George Berkeley, who decided that the contents of the world must be observed in order to exist in the world—in order to be brought from a sort of potential or theoretical existence into an actual existence; or Werner Heisenberg, who revealed the inherent unknowability of the state of the universe’s contents with his Uncertainty Principle and showed mathematically that, in the subatomic realm, particles go from being in a state of being everywhere with every velocity—all with various probabilities—to being in just one place or to having just one velocity upon observation of them; or David Bohm, who studied the flow of electrons in plasmas and quantum theory and came up with his own quantum theory about the origin of the contents of the physical universe from the implicate, or potential, realm; or Stephen Hawking, who studies black holes and who did so even when he wasn’t sure if they were merely theoretical objects without any reality in this physical world or not, and who proposed the existence of Hawking radiation, by which black holes evaporate and appear to emit subatomic particles—which are actually particles that came into existence near the black hole’s event horizon as members of pairs of virtual particles, and that then became real particles in order to preserve the total energy when their virtual partners fell into the black hole), or they tend to concern themselves with real or imaginary stories or worlds that somehow intermingle fiction and reality, imagination and truth, with things from one realm entering into the other (e.g. Alex Haley, who wrote Roots about his African ancestry but who interwove fictional stories into his depiction of his own past; or John Steinbeck, who wrote The Grapes of Wrath about a family in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression and East of Eden about Steinbeck’s maternal grandfather’s family interwoven with the biblical Adam and his family; or George Orwell, who wrote Animal Farm about the Soviet Union in the form of an allegorical story of animals and 1984 about a totalitarian future society—both of which brought reality into a fictional world, dealing with an intermingling of the two; or Walt Disney, who created the cartoon character Mickey Mouse—along with Ub Iwerks, who was born on a Sunday, and who worked with Disney in the creation of new companies and characters—and other cartoon characters that are a melding of human beings and animals in appearance and relationships and so forth, and who formed Disneyland and Disney World, both of which are places where fictional characters and imagined worlds intermingle with, and enter into, reality; or Stan Lee, who created several Marvel Comic book characters and often included himself and other real people in the comic book world where he and they interacted with the fictional characters whom he created).

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Friday


People born on Friday tend to be spokespeople (or people who communicate a lot with the public and other people in the field and generally with other people) for whatever field they enter, and so their names tend to be very recognizable (e.g. the physicist Max Planck, whose work helped found quantum theory; or the physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who was the scientific director of the Manhattan Project; or the chemist Stanley Miller, who sought to understand the origin of life on the early Earth; or the New York Times science writer Dennis Overbye), they tend to bring people and human-made objects to whatever they study or do, imagining people or human-like creatures in realms where they may or may not exist (e.g. Albert Einstein, who imagined people and buses and elevators in space traveling at the speed of light; or the physicist Michio Kaku, who imagines people colonizing space and living in space and on other planets and in other universes; or the astronomer Carl Sagan, who believed that it was highly likely that intelligent, human-like extraterrestrial beings exist elsewhere in the universe), they tend to be drawn to people and human-made objects (e.g. the historian Stephen Ambrose, who studied people and human history, particularly WWII; or Bill Gates, who is the founder and chairman of Microsoft and therefore works with human-produced technology; or Gene Roddenberry, who created Star Trek, which, of course, involves the imagining of people or human-like creatures all throughout the universe; or James Watson, who discovered the structure of DNA—along with Francis Crick, who was born on a Thursday, and who was seeking in the endeavor to find how non-living molecules become living molecules, and who later sought to discover how proteins come from the coding of DNA, and how the non-conscious brain becomes a conscious mind—and who worked on the Human Genome Project, as well as on genetics projects that had the aim of furthering our understanding of cancers and other diseases that affect humans; or Francis Collins, who succeeded Watson as Director of the Human Genome Project, and who has searched for a genetic basis for various diseases that affect humans), and if they write, their writing is very people and character and often technology focused (e.g. Jules Verne, who imagined people traveling into the earth and under the sea and into the air and space, writing of technologies that we didn’t then have; or H. G. Wells, who imagined people traveling in time and going to the moon and finding and fighting with extraterrestrial life; or Frank Herbert, who explored the interactions of human societal forces in his Dune novels; or Michael Crichton, whose writing is filled with dialogue and whose books concern technology, imagining, for example, people in a world filled with biotechnologically-developed dinosaurs, as in Jurassic Park).

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Saturday


People born on Saturday tend to be concerned with the perfection or completion, and often harmonious integration, of things (e.g. Brian Greene, who studies string theory and sees in it the potential for a complete and elegant theory of everything; or Kurt Gödel, who formulated the incompleteness theorem in mathematics; or William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, who sought in the interrelation of various forms of energy a complete and unified theory of physics, and who completed the temperature scale of measurement by making it absolute, so that it begins at absolute zero—zero Kelvin, where there is no energy—and progresses upward by equal increments of energy per temperature number, and who also worked on perfecting such devices as the compass and the telegraph; or Richard Feynman, who worked in several different areas of quantum physics and who, among various other things, developed a sum-over-paths formulation of quantum mechanics that is essentially a complete description of all possible paths of a particle going from one point to another point; or Roger Penrose, who has worked on general relativity as well as quantum mechanics, thereby involving himself in areas all across physics, and who wrote The Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the Laws of Physics, and has suggested requirements for a complete theory of physics that might be able to explain human consciousness; or Adolf Hitler, who had his extremely fixated and therefore not-at-all-harmonious idea of the “Final Solution” that entailed, in his view, the completion and “perfection” of things—as with his conception of the Arian race and so forth), or with a complete and completed peace (e.g. the 14th Dalai Lama, who has been active in working peacefully toward an autonomous Tibet—the completion of Tibet—and who has also been active in establishing a dialogue between different religions and between religion and science, and generally in promoting peace; or Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who has studied the experience of “flow”—of being “in the zone”, with complete concentration on the activity in which one is engaged—which he believes is part of a happy and contented and peaceful experience of life), or with considering things as an integrated whole (e.g. Baruch Spinoza, who considered nature to be equivalent to God, and the mind to be equivalent to the body, and essentially all of reality to be of the same substance, and to be a coherent and systematic perfection that only seems imperfect due to our lack of perception of the whole; or Fritz Perls, who developed Gestalt therapy, which emphasizes complete awareness of what one is feeling and doing, as well as the consideration of the whole person, including the person’s relation to him/herself and to all other things), and they often tend to be popularizers of their field due to their willingness to relate things to almost any other things, the wide purview of their attention and involvement across a field or fields, and the completeness of their explanations (e.g. Kip Thorne, who studies space, time and gravity—in topics from all across the field of general relativity—and who popularized such ideas as that wormholes might be used for time travel; or Henri Poincaré, who contributed to several different and varied fields of mathematics, sought in many ways to complete and perfect some of Hendrik Lorentz’s work, and popularized several aspects of mathematics and physics), or they simply tend to view everything in the world without bias toward one thing or another, showing much variety of involvement (e.g. Leonardo da Vinci, who was involved with a huge variety of things—from painting, to inventing, to studying the body, to sculpting, to building, to writing, to writing music, to studying math, etc.).

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Note:
Dates of birth—which were used to find the calendar weekday of birth using timeanddate.com/calendar—and other information about people in this section were, or can be, obtained mostly from Wikipedia.org. By the way, the examples used here only include people who seem, based on the influence of the days, to have been born before sunset (in which case the weekday of birth as we are defining it—from sunset to sunset in the location of birth—corresponds with the calendar weekday of birth); people who seem, based on the influence of the days, to have been born after sunset (in which case the weekday of birth as we are defining it is the day after the calendar weekday of birth) were not used as examples here.

The Above is Excerpted from

An Experiential Understanding of How All that Is Came to Be

For more information on the correlation between the weekday of birth and where we are inclined to seek fulfillment, including an explanation for why there should be any correlation here at all, see the book


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